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About TATHS

amberley hall 1The Tools and Trades History Society is an educational charity, whose aim is to further the knowledge and understanding of hand tools and the trades in which they were used.

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A special treat for members: Samuel J Hardman's paper on "History of the Can Opener" is available on the Members' page at CanOpeners 

This is a fascinating paper and well worth reading, even if it is not within your area of interest. Mr Hardman has produced a well researched account of the development of the can opener and similar tools, illustrated with photographs from his collection. Some of them look very similar to our "Whatsits"! 

The papers for the 2018 AGM are now available at

2018 TATHS AGM

 Sandy Bathgate has asked us to promote this event in Bathurst, New South Wales.

If you leave now, you should be able to get there by May!

 Tsumitsubo turtle 2 800x450

A Happy New Year to everyone interested in old tools and crafts

As the New Year is a major festival in the Far East, I thought it would be interesting to introduce an oriental flavour and feature some tools from Japan. Here is a short article on Japanese sumitsubo (ink pots for laying down a line on timber), which may be of interest.    

 

Richard Philips has helpfully expanded on the background to our recent publication on ropeworks. Some useful links here. 

The TATHS publication of Mr Ellwood's memoir, 'Yarns from the Ropeworks' is commendably well produced, my compliments to you and your printer. I know how much effort Mrs Robinson put into editing Mr Ellwood's memoir, and taking photographs.

There is a wealth of material contained in the back issues of the TATHS Journals and Newsletters.  It deserves to be better known and used. So, as a present to all our visitors, we are publishing copies of all the issues we hold up to 2012.  You can find them under the "Resources" menu at the top of the page.

The first 70 issues of the Newsletter have been indexed and we have included both a title and a subject index in the lists. The pages also give a short list of key articles in each edition although they do not do justice to the detail and insights which you can find in the correspondence and "Whatsits" sections.   

Go and have a look!